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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2012, Article ID 528521, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/528521
Review Article

Fungal Biofilm Resistance

1Glasgow Dental School, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G2 3JZ, UK
2Microbiology Department, Royal Hospital for Sick Children (Yorkhill Division), Dalnair Street, Glasgow G3 8SJ, UK

Received 22 July 2011; Accepted 23 October 2011

Academic Editor: Nir Osherov

Copyright © 2012 Gordon Ramage et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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