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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2012, Article ID 583792, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/583792
Review Article

Recent Advances in the Use of Drosophila melanogaster as a Model to Study Immunopathogenesis of Medically Important Filamentous Fungi

1Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Crete, Stavrakia, Voutes, 71110 Heraklion, Crete, Greece
2Department of Infectious Diseases, Infection Control and Employee Health, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030, USA

Received 18 August 2011; Accepted 7 November 2011

Academic Editor: Nir Osherov

Copyright © 2012 Georgios Hamilos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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