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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2012, Article ID 626745, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/626745
Review Article

Experimental Models of Cryptococcosis

School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK

Received 19 July 2011; Accepted 4 August 2011

Academic Editor: Julian R. Naglik

Copyright © 2012 Wilber Sabiiti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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