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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2013, Article ID 703905, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/703905
Research Article

Epidemiology and Changes in Patient-Related Factors from 1997 to 2009 in Clinical Yeast Isolates Related to Dermatology, Gynaecology, and Paediatrics

1Klinik für Dermatologie, Venerologie und Allergologie, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin, Germany
2Laboratorium für medizinische Mikrobiologie, Straße des Friedens 8, 04579 Mölbis, Germany
3BDH-Klinik Greifswald GmbH, Karl-Liebknecht-Ring 26a, 17491 Greifswald, Germany
4Institute of Medical Microbiology, Domagkstraße 10, 48149 Münster, Germany
5MBS—Microbiology, P.O. Box 101247, 80086 Munich, Germany

Received 27 April 2013; Revised 30 June 2013; Accepted 1 July 2013

Academic Editor: Isabel Sá-Correia

Copyright © 2013 Viktor Czaika et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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