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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2014, Article ID 267497, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/267497
Review Article

Comparative Analysis of Protein Glycosylation Pathways in Humans and the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans

1Laboratorio de Glicobiología Humana, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Avenida Universidad 1001, Colonia Chamilpa, 62209 Cuernavaca, MOR, Mexico
2Departamento de Ingeniería Genética, Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Avanzados del IPN, 36821 Irapuato, GTO, Mexico
3División de Ciencias Naturales y Exactas, Departamento de Biología, Campus Guanajuato, Universidad de Guanajuato, Noria Alta s/n, Col. Noria Alta, 36050 Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico

Received 17 April 2014; Accepted 6 June 2014; Published 3 July 2014

Academic Editor: Todd R. Callaway

Copyright © 2014 Iván Martínez-Duncker et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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