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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 764046, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/764046
Research Article

Optimization of Amylase Production from B. amyloliquefaciens (MTCC 1270) Using Solid State Fermentation

Department of Biotechnology, Haldia Institute of Technology, ICARE Complex, Purba Medinipur, West Bengal 721657, India

Received 21 January 2014; Revised 21 April 2014; Accepted 21 April 2014; Published 11 May 2014

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Comi

Copyright © 2014 Koel Saha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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