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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 918143, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/918143
Research Article

The TIR Domain Containing Locus of Enterococcus faecalis Is Predominant among Urinary Tract Infection Isolates and Downregulates Host Inflammatory Response

1Institute of Medical Microbiology, Justus Liebig University, Schubertstraße 81, 35392 Giessen, Germany
2Iztacala Superior Studies Faculty, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Avenida de los Barrios 1, Los Reyes Iztacala, 54090 Tlalnepantla, MEX, Mexico

Received 3 April 2014; Revised 11 June 2014; Accepted 30 June 2014; Published 24 July 2014

Academic Editor: Michael McClelland

Copyright © 2014 Thomas Daniel Kraemer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Based on Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain structure homology, we detected a previously uncharacterized gene encoding for a TIR domain containing protein (Tcp) in the genome of Enterococcus faecalis. We assigned this gene the name tcpF (as in Tcp of E. faecalis). Screening of E. faecalis samples revealed that tcpF is more common in isolates from urinary tract infections (UTIs) than in human faecal flora. tcpF alleles showed moderate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) among UTI isolates. Infection of mouse RAW264.7 macrophages with a tcpF knock-out mutant led to elevated cytokine response compared to the isogenic wild type E. faecalis strain. In silico analysis predicted significant tertiary structure homology to the TIR domain of human TLR1 (TLR1-TIR). When transiently expressed in cultured eukaryotic cells, TcpF caused suppression of TLR2-dependent NF-κB activation suggesting for TcpF a role as a factor in E. faecalis that benefits colonization by modulating the host’s immune responses.