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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4829716, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4829716
Research Article

Effect of Trehalose and Trehalose Transport on the Tolerance of Clostridium perfringens to Environmental Stress in a Wild Type Strain and Its Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Mutant

1Division of Microbiology, National Center for Toxicological Research, FDA, Jefferson, AR 72079, USA
2School of Life Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Riccarton, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, UK

Received 1 September 2016; Accepted 10 October 2016

Academic Editor: Barbara H. Iglewski

Copyright © 2016 Miseon Park et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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