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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8526385, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8526385
Research Article

Differential Microbial Diversity in Drosophila melanogaster: Are Fruit Flies Potential Vectors of Opportunistic Pathogens?

1Centro de Biodiversidad y Descubrimiento de Drogas, Instituto de Investigaciones Científicas y Servicios de Alta Tecnología (INDICASAT AIP), Edificio 219, Ciudad del Saber, Apartado 0843-01103, Ciudad de Panamá, Panama
2Department of Biology, University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras, PR, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Luis A. Ramírez-Camejo; moc.liamg@ojemaczerimar

Received 11 April 2017; Revised 30 July 2017; Accepted 24 September 2017; Published 6 November 2017

Academic Editor: Michael McClelland

Copyright © 2017 Luis A. Ramírez-Camejo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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