Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2019, Article ID 2464507, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/2464507
Review Article

Antibacterial Potency of Honey

Divisions of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence should be addressed to Najla A. Albaridi; as.ude.unp@idirablaan

Received 4 December 2018; Revised 19 March 2019; Accepted 14 April 2019; Published 2 June 2019

Academic Editor: Clemencia Chaves-López

Copyright © 2019 Najla A. Albaridi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. World Health Organization (WHO), Traditional Medicine Strategy, World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva, Switzerland, 2014.
  2. C. M. Slover, L. H. Danziger, B. A. Adeniyi, and G. B. Mahady, “Use of natural products to combat multidrug-resistant bacteria,” in New Strategies Combating Bacterial Infection, I. Ahmad and F. Aqil, Eds., pp. 127–135, Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  3. G. B. Mahady, Y. Huang, B. J. Doyle, and T. Locklear, “Natural products as antibacterial agents,” Bioactive Natural Products (Part O), vol. 35, pp. 423–444, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. P. Molan, “Honey: antimicrobial actions and role in disease management,” in New Strategies Combating Bacterial Infection, I. Ahmad and F. Aqil, Eds., pp. 229–253, Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  5. M. S. Butler and A. D. Buss, “Natural products—the future scaffolds for novel antibiotics?” Biochemical Pharmacology, vol. 71, no. 7, pp. 919–929, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. M. D. Mandal and S. Mandal, “Honey: its medicinal property and antibacterial activity,” Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 154–160, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. J. M. Alvarez-Suarez, S. Tulipani, D. Díaz et al., “Antioxidant and antimicrobial capacity of several monofloral Cuban honeys and their correlation with color, polyphenol content and other chemical compounds,” Food and Chemical Toxicology, vol. 48, no. 8-9, pp. 2490–2499, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. M. L. Sanz, M. Gonzalez, C. de Lorenzo, J. Sanz, and I. Martı́nez-Castro, “A contribution to the differentiation between nectar honey and honeydew honey,” Food Chemistry, vol. 91, no. 2, pp. 313–317, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. A. Bentabol Manzanares, Z. H. García, B. R. Galdón, E. R. Rodríguez, and C. D. Romero, “Differentiation of blossom and honeydew honeys using multivariate analysis on the physicochemical parameters and sugar composition,” Food Chemistry, vol. 126, no. 2, pp. 664–672, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. P. C. Molan, “The antibacterial activity of honey,” Bee World, vol. 73, no. 1, pp. 5–28, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. P. J. Torley, R. P. G. Rutgers, B. D’Arcy, and B. R. Bhandari, “Effect of honey types and concentration on starch gelatinization,” LWT—Food Science and Technology, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 161–170, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. R. J. Weston, “The contribution of catalase and other natural products to the antibacterial activity of honey: a review,” Food Chemistry, vol. 71, no. 2, pp. 235–239, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. V. Kaskoniene, P. R. Venskutonis, and V. Ceksterytė, “Carbohydrate composition and electrical conductivity of different origin honeys from Lithuania,” LWT—Food Science and Technology, vol. 43, no. 5, pp. 801–807, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. K. Palka, Chemical and Functional Properties of Food Components, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, USA, 2006.
  15. E. Anklam, “A review of the analytical methods to determine the geographical and botanical origin of honey,” Food Chemistry, vol. 63, no. 4, pp. 549–562, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. S. Ouchemoukh, P. Schweitzer, M. Bachir Bey, H. Djoudad-Kadji, and H. Louaileche, “HPLC sugar profiles of Algerian honeys,” Food Chemistry, vol. 121, no. 2, pp. 561–568, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. S. Bogdanov, “Honey composition. Book of honey,” in Bee Product Science, Scientific Research An Academic Publisher, Wuhan, China, 2017. View at Google Scholar
  18. S. Bogdanov, K. Ruoff, and L. Persano Oddo, “Physico-chemical methods for the characterisation of unifloral honeys: a review,” Apidologie, vol. 35, no. S1, pp. S4–S17, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  19. S. Bogdanov and M. Gfeller, “Classification of honeydew and blossom honeys by discriminant analysis,” Agroscope Liebefeld-Posieux Science, vol. 500, pp. 1–9, 2006. View at Google Scholar
  20. A. Bentabol Manzanares, Z. Hernández García, B. Rodríguez Galdón, E. M. Rodríguez-Rodríguez, and C. Díaz Romero, “Physicochemical characteristics and pollen spectrum of monofloral honeys from Tenerife, Spain,” Food Chemistry, vol. 228, pp. 441–446, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. S. Gomes, L. G. Dias, L. L. Moreira, P. Rodrigues, and L. Estevinho, “Physicochemical, microbiological and antimicrobial properties of commercial honeys from Portugal,” Food and Chemical Toxicology, vol. 48, no. 2, pp. 544–548, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. P. J. Taormina, B. A. Niemira, and L. R. Beuchat, “Inhibitory activity of honey against foodborne pathogens as influenced by the presence of hydrogen peroxide and level of antioxidant power,” International Journal of Food Microbiology, vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 217–225, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. J. Bertoncelj, U. Dobersek, M. Jamnik, and T. Golob, “Evaluation of the phenolic content, antioxidant activity and colour of Slovenian honey,” Food Chemistry, vol. 105, no. 2, pp. 822–828, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. L. Estevinho, A. P. Pereira, L. Moreira, L. G. Dias, and E. Pereira, “Antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of phenolic compounds extracts of Northeast Portugal honey,” Food and Chemical Toxicology, vol. 46, no. 12, pp. 3774–3779, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. K. L. Allen, P. C. Molan, and G. M. Reid, “A survey of the antibacterial activity of some New Zealand honeys,” Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, vol. 43, no. 12, pp. 817–822, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. V. Nanda, B. C. Sarkar, H. K. Sharma, and A. S. Bawa, “Physico-chemical properties and estimation of mineral content in honey produced from different plants in Northern India,” Journal of Food Composition and Analysis, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 613–619, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. T. Marshall and K. M. Williams, “Electrophoresis of honey: characterization of trace proteins from a complex biological matrix by silver staining,” Analytical Biochemistry, vol. 167, no. 2, pp. 301–303, 1987. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. S. Serrano, R. Espejo, M. Villarejo, and M. L. Jodral, “Diastase and invertase activities in Andalusian honeys,” International Journal of Food Science & Technology, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 76–79, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. P. Vit and P. Pulcini, “Diastase and invertase activities in Meliponini and Trigonini honeys from Venezuela,” Journal of Apicultural Research, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 57–62, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. J. W. White Jr., M. H. Subers, and A. I. Schepartz, “The identification of inhibine, the antibacterial factor in honey, as hydrogen peroxide and its origin in a honey glucose-oxidase system,” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, vol. 73, no. 1, pp. 57–70, 1963. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  31. J. M. Andrews, “Determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations,” Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, vol. 49, no. 6, p. 1049, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  32. T. Patton, J. Barrett, J. Brennan, and N. Moran, “Use of a spectrophotometric bioassay for determination of microbial sensitivity to manuka honey,” Journal of Microbiological Methods, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 84–95, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. S. Bogdanov, “Nature and origin of the antibacterial substances in honey,” LWT—Food Science and Technology, vol. 30, no. 7, pp. 748–753, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. P. E. Lusby, A. L. Coombes, and J. M. Wilkinson, “Bactericidal activity of different honeys against pathogenic bacteria,” Archives of Medical Research, vol. 36, no. 5, pp. 464–467, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. D. J. Willix, P. C. Molan, and C. G. Harfoot, “A comparison of the sensitivity of wound-infecting species of bacteria to the antibacterial activity of manuka honey and other honey,” Journal of Applied Bacteriology, vol. 73, no. 5, pp. 388–394, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. R. A. Cooper, P. C. Molan, and K. G. Harding, “Antibacterial activity of honey against strains of Staphylococcus aureus from infected wounds,” Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, vol. 92, no. 6, pp. 283–285, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. M. S. Osato, S. G. Reddy, and D. Y. Graham, “Osmotic effect of honey on growth and viability of Helicobacter pylori,” Digestive Diseases and Sciences, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 462–464, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. M. Küçük, S. Kolaylı, Ş. Karaoğlu, E. Ulusoy, C. Baltacı, and F. Candan, “Biological activities and chemical composition of three honeys of different types from Anatolia,” Food Chemistry, vol. 100, no. 2, pp. 526–534, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. M. M. Cavia, M. A. Fernández-Muiño, S. R. Alonso-Torre, J. F. Huidobro, and M. T. Sancho, “Evolution of acidity of honeys from continental climates: influence of induced granulation,” Food Chemistry, vol. 100, no. 4, pp. 1728–1733, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. M. Ali, “Hydrogen peroxide therapies: recent insights into oxystatic and antimicrobial actions,” Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients, vol. 255, p. 140, 2004. View at Google Scholar
  41. L. M. Bang, C. Buntting, and P. Molan, “The effect of dilution on the rate of hydrogen peroxide production in honey and its implications for wound healing,” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 267–273, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. S. Bogdanov, “Characterisation of antibacterial substances in honey,” LWT—Food Science Technology, vol. 17, pp. 74–76, 1984. View at Google Scholar
  43. L. A. Roth, S. Kwan, and P. Sporns, “Use of a disc-assay system to detect oxytetracycline residues in honey,” Journal of Food Protection, vol. 49, no. 6, pp. 436–441, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  44. K. Brudzynski, K. Abubaker, L. Martin, and A. Castle, “Re-examining the role of hydrogen peroxide in bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities of honey,” Frontiers in Microbiology, vol. 2, pp. 1–9, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. K. Brudzynski and R. Lannigan, “Mechanism of honey bacteriostatic action against MRSA and VRE involves hydroxyl radicals generated from honey’s hydrogen peroxide,” Frontiers in Microbiology, vol. 3, p. 36, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. N. Al-Waili, A. A. Ghamdi, M. J. Ansari, Y. Al-Attal, A. Al-Mubarak, and K. Salom, “Differences in composition of honey samples and their impact on the antimicrobial activities against drug multiresistant bacteria and pathogenic fungi,” Archives of Medical Research, vol. 44, no. 4, pp. 307–316, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. G. Brandi, P. Sestili, M. A. Pedrini, L. Salvaggio, F. Cattabeni, and O. Cantoni, “The effect of temperature or anoxia on Escherichia coli killing induced by hydrogen peroxide,” Mutation Research Letters, vol. 190, no. 4, pp. 237–240, 1987. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. J. A. Imlay and S. Linn, “Bimodal pattern of killing of DNA-repair-defective or anoxically grown Escherichia coli by hydrogen peroxide,” Journal of Bacteriology, vol. 166, no. 2, pp. 519–527, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. K. Brudzynski, “Effect of hydrogen peroxide on antibacterial activities of Canadian honeys,” Canadian Journal of Microbiology, vol. 52, no. 12, pp. 1228–1237, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. D. Adcock, “The effect of catalase on the inhibine and peroxide values of various honeys,” Journal of Apicultural Research, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 38–40, 1962. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  51. K. Brudzynski, K. Abubaker, and D. Miotto, “Unraveling a mechanism of honey antibacterial action: polyphenol/H2O2-induced oxidative effect on bacterial cell growth and on DNA degradation,” Food Chemistry, vol. 133, no. 2, pp. 329–336, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. H. A. L. Wahdan, “Causes of the antimicrobial activity of honey,” Infection, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 26–31, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  53. J. Lachman, M. Orsák, A. Hejtmánková, and E. Kovářová, “Evaluation of antioxidant activity and total phenolics of selected Czech honeys,” LWT—Food Science and Technology, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 52–58, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  54. J. M. Stephens, R. C. Schlothauer, B. D. Morris et al., “Phenolic compounds and methylglyoxal in some New Zealand manuka and kanuka honeys,” Food Chemistry, vol. 120, no. 1, pp. 78–86, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  55. I. C. F. R. Ferreira, E. Aires, J. C. M. Barreira, and L. M. Estevinho, “Antioxidant activity of Portuguese honey samples: different contributions of the entire honey and phenolic extract,” Food Chemistry, vol. 114, no. 4, pp. 1438–1443, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  56. M. Biesaga and K. Pyrzynska, “Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry studies of the phenolic compounds in honey,” Journal of Chromatography A, vol. 1216, no. 38, pp. 6620–6626, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  57. L. Yaoa, Y. Jiang, R. Singanusong, N. Datta, and K. Raymont, “Phenolic acids in Australian Melaleuca, Guioa, Lophostemon, Banksia and Helianthus honeys and their potential for floral authentication,” Food Research International, vol. 38, no. 6, pp. 651–658, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  58. R. J. Weston, L. K. Brocklebank, and Y. Lu, “Identification and quantitative levels of antibacterial components of some New Zealand Manuka honeys,” Food Chemistry, vol. 70, no. 4, pp. 427–435, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  59. R. J. Weston, K. R. Mitchell, and K. L. Allen, “Antibacterial phenolic components of New Zealand manuka honey,” Food Chemistry, vol. 64, no. 3, pp. 295–301, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  60. E. Mavric, S. Wittmann, G. Barth, and T. Henle, “Identification and quantification of methylglyoxal as the dominant antibacterial constituent of Manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) honeys from New Zealand,” Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 483–489, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  61. J. Atrott and T. Henle, “Methylglyoxal in Manuka honey—correlation with antibacterial properties,” Czech Journal of Food Sciences, vol. 27, no. S1, pp. S163–S165, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  62. C. J. Adams, C. H. Boult, B. J. Deadman et al., “Isolation by HPLC and characterisation of the bioactive fraction of New Zealand manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) honey,” Carbohydrate Research, vol. 343, no. 4, pp. 651–659, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  63. C. J. Adams, M. Manley-Harris, and P. C. Molan, “The origin of methylglyoxal in New Zealand manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) honey,” Carbohydrate Research, vol. 344, no. 8, pp. 1050–1053, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  64. M. J. Snow and M. Manley-Harris, “On the nature of non-peroxide antibacterial activity in New Zealand manuka honey,” Food Chemistry, vol. 84, no. 1, pp. 145–147, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  65. K. Brudzynski and D. Miotto, “The relationship between the content of Maillard reaction-like products and bioactivity of Canadian honeys,” Food Chemistry, vol. 124, no. 3, pp. 869–874, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  66. V. M. French, R. A. Cooper, and P. C. Molan, “The antibacterial activity of honey against coagulase-negative staphylococci,” Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 228–231, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  67. N. J. Basson and S. R. Grobler, “Antimicrobial activity of two South African honeys produced from indigenous Leucospermum cordifolium and Erica species on selected micro-organisms,” BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 8, p. 41, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  68. H. T. Tan, R. A. Rahman, S. H. Gan et al., “The antibacterial properties of Malaysian tualang honey against wound and enteric microorganisms in comparison to manuka honey,” BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 9, no. 1, p. 34, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  69. S. M. Lin, P. C. Molan, and R. T. Cursons, “The in vitro susceptibility of Campylobacter spp. to the antibacterial effect of manuka honey,” European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 339–344, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  70. M. Shahid, “Honey: biological characteristics and potential role in disease management,” in New Strategies Combating Bacterial Infection, I. Ahmad and F. Aqil, Eds., pp. 255–274, Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  71. A. Jeddar, A. Kharsany, U. G. Ramsaroop, A. Bhamjee, I. Haffejee, and A. Moosa, “The antibacterial action of honey,” South African Medical Journal, vol. 76, pp. 257-258, 1985. View at Google Scholar
  72. A. A. Al-Jabri, B. Nzeako, Z. Al Mahrooqi, A. Al Naqdy, and H. Nsanze, “In vitro antibacterial activity of Omani and African honey,” British Journal of Biomedical Science, vol. 60, no. 1, pp. 1–4, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  73. A. Alnaqdy, A. Al-Jabri, Z. A. Mahrooqi, B. Nzeako, and H. Nsanze, “Inhibition effect of honey on the adherence of Salmonella to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro,” International Journal of Food Microbiology, vol. 103, no. 3, pp. 347–351, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  74. N. S. Al-Waili, “Investigating the antimicrobial activity of natural honey and its effects on the pathogenic bacterial infections of surgical wounds and conjunctiva,” Journal of Medicinal Food, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 210–222, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  75. T. R. Shamala, Y. P. Shri Jyothi, and P. Saibaba, “Antibacterial effect of honey on the in vitro and in vivo growth of Escherichia coli,” World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology, vol. 18, no. 9, pp. 863–865, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  76. J. M. Wilkinson and H. M. A. Cavanagh, “Antibacterial activity of 13 honeys against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa,” Journal of Medicinal Food, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 100–103, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  77. C. Badet and F. Quero, “The in vitro effect of manuka honeys on growth and adherence of oral bacteria,” Anaerobe, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 19–22, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  78. T. Alandejani, J. Marsan, W. Ferris, R. Slinger, and F. Chan, “Effectiveness of honey on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms,” Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 141, no. 1, pp. 114–118, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  79. O. E. Adeleke, J. O. Olaitan, and E. I. Okpekpe, “Comparative antibacterial activity of honey and gentamicin against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa,” Annals of Burns and Fire Disasters, vol. 19, no. 4, 2006. View at Google Scholar
  80. E. O. Agbaje, T. Ogunsanya, and O. I. Aiwerioba, “Conventional use of honey as antibacterial agent,” Annals of African Medicine, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 78–81, 2006. View at Google Scholar