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International Journal of Nephrology
Volume 2013, Article ID 457490, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/457490
Research Article

Constitutional Nephrin Deficiency in Conditionally Immortalized Human Podocytes Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, Supported by -Catenin/NF-kappa B Activation: A Consequence of Cell Junction Impairment?

1Department of Nephrology, Gaslini Children Hospital, Genoa, Italy
2Department of Biomedical Sciences, Interdepartmental Research Center BIOAGROMED, University of Foggia, Italy
3Laboratorio di Nefrologia, Istituto G. Gaslini, Largo G. Gaslini 5, 16147 Genova, Italy

Received 11 July 2013; Accepted 11 September 2013

Academic Editor: Vladimír Tesař

Copyright © 2013 Gian Marco Ghiggeri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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