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International Journal of Otolaryngology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 982894, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/982894
Research Article

A Pilot Study on Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in Children: Aided CAEPs Reflect Improved High-Frequency Audibility with Frequency Compression Hearing Aid Technology

1National Centre for Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Western Ontario, 1201 Western Road, Elborn College, Room 2262, London, ON, Canada N6G 1H1
2National Centre for Audiology and Program in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences (Hearing Sciences), Faculty of Health Sciences, Western University, London ON, Canada N6G 1H1
3School of Communication Sciences and Disorders and National Centre for Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Western University, London ON, Canada N6G 1H1

Received 25 April 2012; Accepted 14 September 2012

Academic Editor: Harvey B. Abrams

Copyright © 2012 Danielle Glista et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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