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International Journal of Photoenergy
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 864104, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/864104
Review Article

Development of Pillared Clays for Wet Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation of Phenol and Its Application in the Posttreatment of Coffee Wastewater

Estado Sólido y Catálisis Ambiental (ESCA), Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Carrera 30 No. 45-03, Bogotá, Colombia

Received 29 May 2012; Accepted 26 September 2012

Academic Editor: Meenakshisundaram Swaminathan

Copyright © 2012 Nancy R. Sanabria et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

This paper focuses on the use of pillared clays as catalysts for the Fenton-like advanced oxidation, specifically wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO). This paper discusses the limitations on the application of a homogeneous Fenton system, development of solid catalysts for the oxidation of phenol, advances in the synthesis of pillared clays, and their potential application as catalysts for phenol oxidation. Finally, it analyzes the use of pillared clays as heterogeneous Fenton-like catalysts for a real wastewater treatment, emphasizing the oxidation of phenolic compounds present in coffee wastewater. Typically, the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation in a real effluent system is used as pretreatment, prior to biological treatment. In the specific case of coffee wet processing wastewater, catalytic oxidation with pillared bentonite with Al-Fe is performed to supplement the biological treatment, that is, as a posttreatment system. According to the results of catalytic activity of pillared bentonite with Al-Fe for oxidation of coffee processing wastewater (56% phenolic compounds conversion, 40% selectivity towards CO2, and high stability of active phase), catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation emerges as a viable alternative for management of this type of effluent.