Table of Contents
International Journal of Palliative Care
Volume 2014, Article ID 564619, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/564619
Review Article

An Integrated Literature Review of Death Education in Pre-Registration Nursing Curricula: Key Themes

1Faculty of Health & Social Care, The Open University in Scotland, 10 Drumsheugh Gardens, Edinburgh EH3 7QJ, UK
2Faculty of Health & Social Care, The Open University in London, 1-11 Hawley Crescent, Camden Town, London NW1 8NP, UK

Received 29 May 2013; Accepted 3 September 2013; Published 2 January 2014

Academic Editors: L. Deliens, C. Knapp, S. Mcilfatrick, P. J. Newton, and M. O’Connor

Copyright © 2014 Joyce Cavaye and Jacqueline H. Watts. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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