Table of Contents
International Journal of Palliative Care
Volume 2015, Article ID 469174, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/469174
Research Article

Attitudes of Nonpalliative Care Nurses towards Palliative Care

1St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW 2217, Australia
2Centre for Research in Nursing and Health, St George Hospital, Level 1 James Laws House, Kogarah, NSW 2217, Australia
3School of Nursing, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia

Received 26 September 2014; Revised 1 December 2014; Accepted 11 December 2014

Academic Editor: Luc Deliens

Copyright © 2015 Victoria Tait et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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