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International Journal of Pediatrics
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 167261, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/167261
Research Article

Danger Signs of Childhood Pneumonia: Caregiver Awareness and Care Seeking Behavior in a Developing Country

1Department of Paediatrics, Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Enugu State, Nigeria
2Child Survival Unit, Medical Research Council UK, The Gambia Unit, Fajara, Gambia
3Department of Paediatrics, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Anambra, Nigeria
4Department of Paediatrics, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu State, Nigeria
5Department of Paediatrics, Federal Teaching Hospital Abakaliki, Ebonyi, Nigeria

Received 31 May 2015; Accepted 4 October 2015

Academic Editor: Alessandro Mussa

Copyright © 2015 Ikenna K. Ndu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Efforts to reduce child mortality especially in Africa must as a necessity aim to decrease mortality due to pneumonia. To achieve this, preventive strategies such as expanding vaccination coverage are key. However once a child develops pneumonia prompt treatment which is essential to survival is dependent on mothers and caregiver recognition of the symptoms and danger signs of pneumonia. Methods. This community based cross-sectional study enrolled four hundred and sixty-six caregivers in Enugu state. It aimed to determine knowledge of caregivers about danger signs of pneumonia and the sociodemographic factors that influence knowledge and care seeking behaviour of caregivers. Results. There is poor knowledge of the aetiology and danger signs of pneumonia among caregivers. Higher maternal educational attainment and residence in semiurban area were significantly associated with knowledge of aetiology, danger signs, and vaccination of their children against pneumonia. Fast breathing and difficulty in breathing were the commonest known and experienced WHO recognized danger signs while fever was the commonest perceived danger sign among caregivers. Conclusion. Knowledge of danger signs and health seeking behaviour among caregivers is inadequate. There is need for intensified public and hospital based interventions targeted at mothers to improve their knowledge about pneumonia.