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International Journal of Peptides
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 370297, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/370297
Review Article

Epithelial Antimicrobial Peptides: Guardian of the Oral Cavity

1Department of Dentistry, ESIC Medical College and Hospital, Faridabad, Haryana 121001, India
2Department of Periodontics, Faculty of Dental Sciences, SGT University, Gurgaon, Haryana 122505, India

Received 18 June 2014; Revised 18 August 2014; Accepted 3 September 2014; Published 11 November 2014

Academic Editor: Hubert Vaudry

Copyright © 2014 Mayank Hans and Veenu Madaan Hans. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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