Table of Contents
International Journal of Plant Genomics
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 915061, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/915061
Review Article

Methodologies for In Vitro Cloning of Small RNAs and Application for Plant Genome(s)

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, 3234 MERF, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
2Molecular Genetics, Integrated DNA Technologies, 1710 Commercial Park, Coralville, IA 52241, USA
3Center of Genomic Technologies, Institute of Genetics and Plant Experimental Biology, Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan, Yuqori Yuz, Qibray region Tashkent district, Tashkent 111226, Uzbekistan

Received 17 February 2009; Accepted 30 March 2009

Academic Editor: Chunji Liu

Copyright © 2009 Eric J. Devor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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