Table of Contents
International Journal of Population Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 486079, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/486079
Research Article

Variations in Desired Family Size and Excess Fertility in East Africa

1Applied Statistics Department, University of Rwanda, University Avenue 1, BP 117, Butare, Rwanda
2International Development Studies Department, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC Utrecht, The Netherlands
3Department of Human Geography and Planning, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC Utrecht, The Netherlands

Received 12 February 2014; Revised 23 April 2014; Accepted 30 April 2014; Published 27 May 2014

Academic Editor: Sidney R. Schuler

Copyright © 2014 Dieudonné Ndaruhuye Muhoza et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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