Table of Contents
International Journal of Proteomics
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 657261, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/657261
Research Article

Expression of Heat Shock and Other Stress Response Proteins in Ticks and Cultured Tick Cells in Response to Anaplasma spp. Infection and Heat Shock

1Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos IREC (CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real, Spain
2Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA
3Centro de Biología Molecular “Severo Ochoa” (CSIC-UAM), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain
4Utrecht Centre for Tick-borne Diseases (UCTD), Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 1, 3584CL Utrecht, The Netherlands
5Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, Km. 5 carretera Victoria-Mante, Ciudad Victoria, 87000 Tamaulipas, Mexico
6Intituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Sicilia, Via G. Marinuzzi no. 3, Palermo, 90129 Sicily, Italy

Received 8 June 2010; Revised 13 July 2010; Accepted 29 July 2010

Academic Editor: David Sheehan

Copyright © 2010 Margarita Villar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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