Table of Contents
International Journal of Proteomics
Volume 2014, Article ID 163962, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/163962
Research Article

Enhanced Photosynthesis and Carbon Metabolism Favor Arsenic Tolerance in Artemisia annua, a Medicinal Plant as Revealed by Homology-Based Proteomics

1Laboratory of Morphogenesis, Center of Advanced Study in Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India
2Laboratory of Algal Biology, Molecular Biology Section, Center of Advanced Study in Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India

Received 19 October 2013; Accepted 3 February 2014; Published 29 April 2014

Academic Editor: David Sheehan

Copyright © 2014 Rashmi Rai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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