Table of Contents
International Journal of Proteomics
Volume 2016, Article ID 1384523, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1384523
Research Article

S-Nitrosylation Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Human Heart Failure

1Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB), Galveston, TX 77555, USA
2Department Preventive Medicine and Community Health, UTMB, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
3Institute for Translational Sciences, UTMB, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center of Molecular Medicine, UTMB, Galveston TX 77555, USA
5Department of Microbiology and Immunology, UTMB, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
6Instituto de Patología Experimental, CONICET-UNSa, 4400 Salta, Argentina
7Department of Internal Medicine-Endocrinology, UTMB, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
8Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, UTMB, Galveston, TX 77555, USA

Received 30 January 2016; Revised 7 April 2016; Accepted 16 May 2016

Academic Editor: Christoph H. Borchers

Copyright © 2016 Sue-jie Koo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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