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International Journal of Polymer Science
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 312615, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/312615
Research Article

Novel Composite Materials for Chiral Separation from Cellulose and Barium Sulfate

1Key Lab for Large-Format Battery Materials and Systems, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China
2Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Process of the Ministry of Education, Hubei Key Laboratory of Novel Chemical Reactor and Green Chemical Technology, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430073, China

Received 17 August 2013; Revised 3 October 2013; Accepted 6 November 2013

Academic Editor: Yingkui Yang

Copyright © 2013 Wei Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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