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International Journal of Rheumatology
Volume 2013, Article ID 284145, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/284145
Research Article

Controlled Cohort Study of Serum Gonadal and Adrenocortical Steroid Levels in Males Prior to Onset of Rheumatoid Arthritis (pre-RA): A Comparison to pre-RA Females and Sex Differences among the Study Groups

1Medicine and Epidemiology, College of Medicine (UICOMP), University of Illinois, Peoria, IL 61656, USA
2Department of Medicine, UICOMP, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL 61656, USA
3University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria (UICOMP), Peoria, IL 61656, USA
4Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA

Received 18 July 2013; Accepted 8 September 2013

Academic Editor: Ruben Burgos-Vargas

Copyright © 2013 Alfonse T. Masi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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