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International Journal of Rheumatology
Volume 2017, Article ID 1037051, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1037051
Research Article

Hard Physical Work Intensifies the Occupational Consequence of Physician-Diagnosed Back Disorder: Prospective Cohort Study with Register Follow-Up among 10,000 Workers

1National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark
2Physical Activity and Human Performance Group, SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark

Correspondence should be addressed to Emil Sundstrup; kd.ewcrn@use

Received 26 August 2016; Accepted 11 January 2017; Published 31 January 2017

Academic Editor: Bruce M. Rothschild

Copyright © 2017 Emil Sundstrup and Lars Louis Andersen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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