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International Journal of Reproductive Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 719050, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/719050
Review Article

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Insulin Resistance, and Obesity: Navigating the Pathophysiologic Labyrinth

1Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine, University of Zulia, Maracaibo 4004, Venezuela
2Institute of Clinical Immunology, The University of Los Andes, Mérida 5101, Venezuela

Received 1 September 2013; Revised 16 December 2013; Accepted 18 December 2013; Published 28 January 2014

Academic Editor: Daniela Romualdi

Copyright © 2014 Joselyn Rojas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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