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International Journal of Surgical Oncology
Volume 2012, Article ID 406830, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/406830
Review Article

The Current State of Targeted Agents in Rectal Cancer

1Department of Surgery, Catholic University of Daegu, 3056-6 Daemyung-4 Dong, Nam-Gu, Daegu 705-718, Republic of Korea
2Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, The University of Texas, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Box 0426, Houston, TX 77030, USA

Received 9 January 2012; Accepted 16 March 2012

Academic Editor: Nikolaos Touroutoglou

Copyright © 2012 Dae Dong Kim and Cathy Eng. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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