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International Journal of Surgical Oncology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 419712, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/419712
Clinical Study

Incisional Surgical Site Infection after Elective Open Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Kita 15, Nishi 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638, Japan
2Department of Surgery, Keiyukai Sapporo Hospital, Kita 1-1, Hondori 14, Shiroishi-ku, Sapporo 003-0027, Japan

Received 3 January 2014; Accepted 4 March 2014; Published 27 March 2014

Academic Editor: Steven Heys

Copyright © 2014 Kosuke Ishikawa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence and risk factors for incisional surgical site infections (SSI) in patients undergoing elective open surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods. We conducted prospective surveillance of incisional SSI after elective colorectal resections performed by a single surgeon for a 1-year period. Variables associated with infection, as identified in the literature, were collected and statistically analyzed for their association with incisional SSI development. Results. A total of 224 patients were identified for evaluation. The mean patient age was 67 years, and 120 (55%) were male. Thirty-three (14.7%) patients were diagnosed with incisional SSI. Multivariate analysis suggested that incisional SSI was independently associated with TNM stages III and IV (odds ratio [OR], 2.4) and intraoperative hypotension (OR, 3.4). Conclusions. The incidence of incisional SSI in our cohort was well within values generally reported in the literature. Our data suggest the importance of the maintenance of intraoperative normotension to reduce the development of incisional SSI.