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International Journal of Surgical Oncology
Volume 2015, Article ID 684021, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/684021
Research Article

Minimising Unnecessary Mastectomies in a Predominantly Chinese Community

1Breast Surgical Oncology, MammoCare, 38 Irrawaddy No. 06-21, Singapore 329563
2MammoCare, 38 Irrawaddy No. 06-21, Singapore 329563
3Medical Education, Mount Elizabeth Hospital, 3 Mount Elizabeth No. 17-16, Singapore 228510

Received 14 September 2014; Accepted 2 January 2015

Academic Editor: C. H. Yip

Copyright © 2015 Mona P. Tan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Recent data shows that the use of breast conservation treatment (BCT) for breast cancer may result in superior outcomes when compared with mastectomy. However, reported rates of BCT in predominantly Chinese populations are significantly lower than those reported in Western countries. Low BCT rates may now be a concern as they may translate into suboptimal outcomes. A study was undertaken to evaluate BCT rates in a cohort of predominantly Chinese women. Methods. All patients who underwent surgery on the breast at the authors’ healthcare facility between October 2008 and December 2011 were included in the study and outcomes of treatment were evaluated. Results. A total of 171 patients were analysed. Two-thirds of the patients were of Chinese ethnicity. One hundred and fifty-six (85.9%) underwent BCT. Ninety-eight of 114 Chinese women (86%) underwent BCT. There was no difference in the proportion of women undergoing BCT based on ethnicity. After a median of 49 months of follow-up, three patients (1.8%) had local recurrence and 5 patients (2.9%) suffered distant metastasis. Four patients (2.3%) have died from their disease. Conclusion. BCT rates exceeding 80% in a predominantly Chinese population are possible with acceptable local and distant control rates, thereby minimising unnecessary mastectomies.