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International Journal of Vascular Medicine
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 823525, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/823525
Review Article

Regulation of Cerebral Blood Flow

1Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
2Division of Neurosurgery, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
3Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001, Henan Province, China

Received 10 April 2011; Accepted 26 May 2011

Academic Editor: Aaron S. Dumont

Copyright © 2011 Eric C. Peterson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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