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International Journal of Vascular Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 750126, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/750126
Review Article

Targeting Endothelial Dysfunction in Vascular Complications Associated with Diabetes

1Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Diabetic Complications Division, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, P.O. Box 6492, St. Kilda Road Central, Melbourne, VIC 8008, Australia
2The James Hogg Research Centre at St. Paul's Hospital and Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6Z 1Y6

Received 1 July 2011; Accepted 4 August 2011

Academic Editor: Matthew R. Spite

Copyright © 2012 Arpeeta Sharma et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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