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International Journal of Vascular Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 160534, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/160534
Clinical Study

Greater Endothelial Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease

1Reynolds Oklahoma Center on Aging, Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC), Oklahoma City, OK 73117, USA
2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA
3Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, OUHSC, Oklahoma City, OK 73117, USA
4Cardiovascular Section, Department of Medicine, OUHSC, Oklahoma City, OK 73117, USA

Received 13 February 2014; Revised 5 May 2014; Accepted 5 May 2014; Published 20 May 2014

Academic Editor: Robert M. Schainfeld

Copyright © 2014 Andrew W. Gardner et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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