Table of Contents
International Journal of Vehicular Technology
Volume 2013, Article ID 526180, 27 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/526180
Review Article

Automotive Technology and Human Factors Research: Past, Present, and Future

1Human Technology Research Institute, AIST, Japan
2University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI), USA
3Institute of Ergonomics, Technische Universität München, Germany

Received 14 February 2013; Accepted 7 May 2013

Academic Editor: Tang-Hsien Chang

Copyright © 2013 Motoyuki Akamatsu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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