Table of Contents
International Journal of Vehicular Technology
Volume 2013, Article ID 817179, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/817179
Research Article

Identification of Cognitive Distraction Using Physiological Features for Adaptive Driving Safety Supporting System

1Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Aichi Prefectural University, 1522-3 Ibaragabasama, Aichi, Nagakute, Japan
2Department of Medical Information Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 1001-1 Kishioka, Mie, Suzuka 510-0293, Japan

Received 6 March 2013; Accepted 26 May 2013

Academic Editor: Martin Reisslein

Copyright © 2013 Haruki Kawanaka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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