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International Journal of Zoology
Volume 2009, Article ID 218197, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/218197
Review Article

Coelomocytes: Biology and Possible Immune Functions in Invertebrates with Special Remarks on Nematodes

Nematode Research Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, India

Received 4 June 2008; Revised 22 September 2008; Accepted 6 November 2008

Academic Editor: Gregory Demas

Copyright © 2009 Qudsia Tahseen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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