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International Journal of Zoology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 507524, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/507524
Research Article

Female Sprague Dawley Rats Show Impaired Spatial Memory in the 8-Arm Radial Maze under Dim Blue and Red Light

Laboratory Psychiatry and Exp. Alzheimers Research, Innsbruck Medical University, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria

Received 13 April 2010; Revised 16 June 2010; Accepted 16 June 2010

Academic Editor: Greg Demas

Copyright © 2010 Michael Pirchl et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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