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International Journal of Zoology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 860801, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/860801
Review Article

The Possible Role of the Uropygial Gland on Mate Choice in Domestic Chicken

Division of Anatomy & Embryology, Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi 329-0498, Japan

Received 30 January 2011; Accepted 14 May 2011

Academic Editor: Hynek Burda

Copyright © 2011 Atsushi Hirao. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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