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International Journal of Zoology
Volume 2012, Article ID 378913, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/378913
Research Article

Density-Dependent Habitat Selection in a Growing Threespine Stickleback Population

Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65, 00014 Helsinki, Finland

Received 19 March 2012; Revised 19 April 2012; Accepted 19 April 2012

Academic Editor: Thomas Iliffe

Copyright © 2012 Ulrika Candolin and Marita Selin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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