Table of Contents
Journal of Insects
Volume 2013, Article ID 130694, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/130694
Research Article

Observations of Resource Use by the Threatened Diana Fritillary Butterfly (Speyeria diana) in the Southern Appalachian Mountains, USA

1Department of Biological Sciences, 132 Long Hall, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA
2Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute, Watauga Campus, Boone, NC 28607, USA

Received 21 May 2013; Revised 18 August 2013; Accepted 26 August 2013

Academic Editor: Benjamin Hoffmann

Copyright © 2013 Carrie N. Wells and Eric A. Smith. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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