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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases
Volume 2008 (2008), Article ID 314762, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/314762
Research Article

Combining Microarray Technology and Molecular Epidemiology to Identify Genes Associated with Invasive Group B Streptococcus

1Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
2Program in Bioinformatics, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI 48197, USA
3Fargo VA Medical Center, Fargo, ND 58102, USA

Received 29 August 2007; Accepted 29 November 2007

Academic Editor: Joshua P. Metlay

Copyright © 2008 Lixin Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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