Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 138487, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/138487
Research Article

Effects of Nitrogen on Temporal and Spatial Patterns of Nitrate in Streams and Soil Solution of a Central Hardwood Forest

1Department of Biological Sciences, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755-2510, USA
2Timber and Watershed Laboratory, USDA Forest Service, Parsons, WV 26287, USA

Received 11 January 2011; Accepted 7 February 2011

Academic Editors: D. Gerten and S. Loppi

Copyright © 2011 Frank S. Gilliam and Mary Beth Adams. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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