Table of Contents
ISRN Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 279149, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/279149
Review Article

Molecular Diagnosis of Sexually Transmitted Chlamydia trachomatis in the United States

1Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53233, USA
2Wheaton Franciscan Laboratory, 11020 West Plank Court, Suite 100, Wauwatosa, WI 53226, USA
3College of Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA

Received 4 March 2011; Accepted 27 April 2011

Academic Editor: E. Petru

Copyright © 2011 April L. Harkins and Erik Munson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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