Table of Contents
ISRN Neurology
Volume 2011, Article ID 306918, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/306918
Review Article

Embodying Emotional Disorders: New Hypotheses about Possible Emotional Consequences of Motor Disorders in Parkinson's Disease and Tourette's Syndrome

1Laboratoire de Psychologie Sociale et Cognitive (LAPSCO) and CNRS, Université Blaise Pascal, Clermont Université, BP 10448, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France, UMR, and CNRS 6024, 34 avenue Carnot, 63037 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex, France
2Institut Universitaire de France, France
3Research Unit for Emotion, Cognition, and Health, Psychology Department, Université Catholique de Louvain (UCL), 10 Place du Cardinal Mercier, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
4Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), Belgium
5Service de Psychiatrie A (EA 3845), CHRU Clermont-Ferrand Gabriel-Montpied, 58 Boulevard Montalembert, 63003 Clermont Ferrand, France
6Service de Neurologie A (EA 3845), CHRU Clermont-Ferrand Gabriel-Montpied, 58 Boulevard Montalembert, 63003 Clermont Ferrand, France

Received 24 March 2011; Accepted 10 May 2011

Academic Editor: D. Janigro

Copyright © 2011 Martial Mermillod et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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