Table of Contents
ISRN Dentistry
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 340960, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/340960
Case Report

Clinical and Surgical Management of an Aggressive Cherubism Treated with Autogenous Bone Graft and Calcitonin

1Bioscience Center for Special Health Care Needs (Centro de Biociências Aplicado a Pacientes com Necessidades Especiais/CEBAPE-UNESP), São José dos Campos Dental School of the São Paulo State University (UNESP), São José dos Campos, São Paulo, Brazil
2Special Health Care Needs Association (Associação Pró-Saúde para Pacientes com Necessidades Especiais-ASPE), São José dos Campos, São Paulo, Brazil
3Centro de Biociências Aplicado a Pacientes com Necessidades Especiais - CEBAPE/UNESP, Av. Eng. Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos, São Paulo, Brazil
4São José dos Campos Dental School of the São Paulo State University (UNESP), São José dos Campos, São Paulo, Brazil
5Private Practice in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Prosthesis, Taubaté, SP, Brazil
6Vale do Rio Verde de Três Corações University (UNINCOR), Minas Gerais, Brazil

Received 7 September 2010; Accepted 10 October 2010

Academic Editors: H. Sedano and D. Wray

Copyright © 2011 Mônica Fernandes Gomes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Cherubism is a rare autosomal-dominant inherited syndrome and is usually self-limiting; it starts in early childhood and involutes by puberty. It is a benign fibroosseous disease, characterized by excessive bone degradation of the upper and lower jaws followed by development of fibrous tissue masses. The purpose of this clinical report is to describe a rare and aggressive form of cherubism on an adult female patient that has been treated in our Bioscience Center for Special Health Care Needs-CEBAPE. The patient was firstly submitted to the surgical procedure with partial curettage of the lesion, and the cavity was filled with autogenous cancellous bone and bone marrow grafts. Furthermore, the support treatment used was the administration of salmon calcitonin by nasal spray during the first year after the preconized procedure. At 4-year followup, we confirmed the stomatognathic system improvement and esthetic rehabilitation, which led to a significant increase in the patient's quality of life.