Table of Contents
ISRN Pathology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 367280, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/367280
Research Article

Hydralazine Reverses Stress-Induced Elevations in Blood Pressure, Angiotensin II, Testosterone, and Coronary Pathology in a Social Colony Model

Department of Biology, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3908, USA

Received 4 April 2011; Accepted 18 May 2011

Academic Editor: A. Wincewicz

Copyright © 2011 Changying Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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