Table of Contents
ISRN Organic Chemistry
Volume 2011, Article ID 434613, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/434613
Research Article

A Remarkably High-Speed Solution-Phase Combinatorial Synthesis of 2-Substituted-Amino-4-Aryl Thiazoles in Polar Solvents in the Absence of a Catalyst under Ambient Conditions and Study of Their Antimicrobial Activities

Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Sinhgad College of Pharmacy, Vadgaon (Bk), Pune, Maharashtra 411041, India

Received 26 January 2011; Accepted 8 March 2011

Academic Editor: T. Ogiku

Copyright © 2011 Satish N. Dighe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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