Table of Contents
ISRN Pharmacology
Volume 2011, Article ID 451682, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/451682
Research Article

Effect of Rosmarinic and Caffeic Acids on Inflammatory and Nociception Process in Rats

1Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Campus Capão do Leão S/N Caixa Postal 354, 96010-900 Pelotas, RS, Brazil
2Instituto de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Feevale, RS 239, 2755, 93352-000 Novo Hamburgo, RS, Brazil
3Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Sarmento Leite, 500, 107, 90046-900 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
4Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Curso de Farmácia, Rua Miguel Tostes 101, 92420-280 Canoas, RS, Brazil
5Fundação Estadual de Produção e Pesquisa em Saúde/Centro de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico, Avenue Ipiranga, 5400, 90610-000 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

Received 12 January 2011; Accepted 10 February 2011

Academic Editor: S. R. Chen

Copyright © 2011 Giovana Duzzo Gamaro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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