Table of Contents
ISRN Nursing
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 534803, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/534803
Research Article

Tanzanian Nurses Understanding and Practice of Spiritual Care

1Tanzania Institute of Higher Education, The Aga Khan University, P.O. Box 38129, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
2Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, 3rd Floor Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2G3

Received 5 March 2011; Accepted 19 April 2011

Academic Editors: A. Kenny and A. B. Wakefield

Copyright © 2011 Khairunnisa Aziz Dhamani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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