Table of Contents
ISRN Immunology
Volume 2011, Article ID 536484, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/536484
Research Article

Advantages of Sirolimus in a Calcineurin-Inhibitor Minimization Protocol for the Immunosuppressive Management of Kidney Allograft Recipients

1Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, 1107 2020 Beirut, Lebanon
2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, 1107 2020 Beirut, Lebanon
3Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, 1107 2020 Beirut, Lebanon

Received 5 May 2011; Accepted 25 June 2011

Academic Editors: T. Koshiba, M. Muro, and E. H. Weiss

Copyright © 2011 Elias A. Rahal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

A myriad of immunosuppressive agents is currently available for the management of graft recipients; however, a consensus on the optimum immunopharmacological plan is nonextant. Twenty kidney recipients on quadruple (mycophenolate mofetil, prednisone, cyclosporine A or tacrolimus, and sirolimus) therapy and 85 on triple therapy where sirolimus was excluded were analyzed for graft rejection or loss within a posttransplant surveillance period of 3 years. Only 1 of 20 recipients (5%) on quadruple therapy experienced a rejection episode. On the other hand, 13 of 85 recipients (15.3%) on triple therapy had a rejection episode or lost the graft. Overall, 14 of 105 recipients (13.3%) experienced a rejection episode or kidney loss. Our observations indicate that an immunosuppressive regimen including sirolimus is advantageous for the management of kidney allograft recipients in the short term.