Table of Contents
ISRN Veterinary Science
Volume 2011, Article ID 613172, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/613172
Review Article

The Benefits of Supplementary Fat in Feed Rations for Ruminants with Particular Focus on Reducing Levels of Methane Production

IBHV, Faculty of Life Sciences, Copenhagen University, Grønnegaardsvej 7, 1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark

Received 18 April 2011; Accepted 25 May 2011

Academic Editor: R. M. Akers

Copyright © 2011 J. Rasmussen and A. Harrison. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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